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Thursday, December 20, 2007


Question of the day
Identify this machine, give its purpose and also tell why it was in news recently.
Clue: It was mentioned at one of the quizzes recently.








Hi all. Due to the unfortunate break-up of me and my quiz partner I am in search of a ‘decent’ quizzer from NSIT. I know this post is not suitable for the blog but please understand the gravity of the situation (bhavnao ko samjho).
My specialties--> Sports, India, politics, bollywood.
Any interested guy should be preferably good in English music and movies, literature, mythology. Do leave in your comments if you are interested.

7 comments:

rishabh said...

thats the enigma code machine.

rishabh said...

used during ww2

rusty said...

is it a dvorak keyboard

Mridul said...

This is the Enigma cryptography machine.
Enigma was a rotor machine whose rotors produced polyalphabetic substitution cipher....
I think Alan Turing was responsible for breaking the Enigma codes

abhimanyu said...

Its a give-away. You haven't edited the title of the image.

Tikna said...

ROFL !

SAHIL said...

Sorry for the error. Will learn as I post more questions.
This is the Enigma coding machine used by the Nazis.
The following part is the excerpt from an article of The New York Times.
"It was recently stolen from a glass display cabinet in the museum, in the Bletchley Park estate that was the clandestine wartime office of the remarkable team of crossword puzzle experts, linguists, chess masters, mathematicians and refugee intellectuals the British assembled to read encrypted enemy communications.
The Enigma machine, which looks like an oversized typewriter, was used by German military intelligence for top secret communications between members of the Nazi high command. Enigma used a series of electrical rotors to scramble messages in an astronomical number of ways. To further confound the Allies, each day the German operators would alter the wiring on their transmitters and receivers.
The capture of Enigma technology by the Royal Navy from a disabled Nazi submarine in May 1941 enabled the Bletchley Park counterintelligence people finally to decipher the code that Berlin had thought uncrackable.
Their accomplishment has been credited for Allied successes in destroying much of the Italian Navy, mounting a defense against U-boat attacks on Allied convoys and decimating the supply shipments for Rommel's North African campaign. The code breakers believed that the work at Bletchley Park shortened the war by two years, and General Eisenhower gave them credit for saving thousands of lives.
The existence of the Bletchley Park 10,000-member spy unit, known as Station X, was never disclosed during the war, prompting Churchill to call the members "the geese that laid the golden eggs and never cackled."

Thursday, December 20, 2007


Question of the day
Identify this machine, give its purpose and also tell why it was in news recently.
Clue: It was mentioned at one of the quizzes recently.








Hi all. Due to the unfortunate break-up of me and my quiz partner I am in search of a ‘decent’ quizzer from NSIT. I know this post is not suitable for the blog but please understand the gravity of the situation (bhavnao ko samjho).
My specialties--> Sports, India, politics, bollywood.
Any interested guy should be preferably good in English music and movies, literature, mythology. Do leave in your comments if you are interested.

7 comments:

rishabh said...

thats the enigma code machine.

rishabh said...

used during ww2

rusty said...

is it a dvorak keyboard

Mridul said...

This is the Enigma cryptography machine.
Enigma was a rotor machine whose rotors produced polyalphabetic substitution cipher....
I think Alan Turing was responsible for breaking the Enigma codes

abhimanyu said...

Its a give-away. You haven't edited the title of the image.

Tikna said...

ROFL !

SAHIL said...

Sorry for the error. Will learn as I post more questions.
This is the Enigma coding machine used by the Nazis.
The following part is the excerpt from an article of The New York Times.
"It was recently stolen from a glass display cabinet in the museum, in the Bletchley Park estate that was the clandestine wartime office of the remarkable team of crossword puzzle experts, linguists, chess masters, mathematicians and refugee intellectuals the British assembled to read encrypted enemy communications.
The Enigma machine, which looks like an oversized typewriter, was used by German military intelligence for top secret communications between members of the Nazi high command. Enigma used a series of electrical rotors to scramble messages in an astronomical number of ways. To further confound the Allies, each day the German operators would alter the wiring on their transmitters and receivers.
The capture of Enigma technology by the Royal Navy from a disabled Nazi submarine in May 1941 enabled the Bletchley Park counterintelligence people finally to decipher the code that Berlin had thought uncrackable.
Their accomplishment has been credited for Allied successes in destroying much of the Italian Navy, mounting a defense against U-boat attacks on Allied convoys and decimating the supply shipments for Rommel's North African campaign. The code breakers believed that the work at Bletchley Park shortened the war by two years, and General Eisenhower gave them credit for saving thousands of lives.
The existence of the Bletchley Park 10,000-member spy unit, known as Station X, was never disclosed during the war, prompting Churchill to call the members "the geese that laid the golden eggs and never cackled."